Source: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Ladybug_larva_(Coccinellidae).jpg



   Watch this  YouTube video  about the “Tree of Heaven” – Ailanthus altissima – the tree that the Spotted Lanternfly likes best. The video shows what it looks like, explains why you should not cut it down, and explains the “Hack and Squirt method”, which works best on this problem tree. The video also tells the best time of year to do it.




View
how to make a simple trap  in this YouTube video. You may have heard about this middle school student’s invention on the news. I made this trap last year and it worked really well.

DON'T  WORRY ABOUT THIS HARMLESS INSECT

MORE ABOUT THE SPOTTED LANTERN FLY: WHAT, WHY, HOW & WHEN

Mosquito

​   ​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​I am seeing a great number of Ladybug larvae right now. So here are some photos of them so that when you see any you leave them alone to do what they do best: eat aphids from our plants in great numbers. (Hopefully they’ll learn the Spotted Lanternfly juveniles are edible too. Time will tell). Meanwhile, get to know this lovely little insect that is often described as a miniature “alligator”. They are about 1/2” long, and they are beneficial insects with a huge appetites, but they won't hurt you. Different kinds of adult Ladybugs have different looking larvae. Here are just a few.

Source: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Tipulidae_April_2008-2.jpg

Source: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:AilanthusAltissimaFlower2.jpg

*************************************************

Cranefly


WANTED: ALIVE!




cheltenham chamber of citizens


​​and

MORE ABOUT THE SPOTTED LANTERNFLY

by Judith Gratz, Environmental Education Specialist



 

​    Like most insects, these neither harm nor help us. The picture to the right is a Cranefly. Craneflies live most of their lives as larvae in water. When they become adults they fly around looking for a mate, and die once they mate and lay their eggs – usually 

 

          


 

no more than 3 days. Because they don’t eat or sting or bite they are harmless to us. Many of them don’t even have mouthparts. They are good food for insectivorous animals. Don’t mistake them for mosquitoes. They are NOT mosquitoes, though they are often mistaken as huge versions of those little pests.

 

          

In Case You Missed Them - Here are Previous EIYCU Posts

*************************************************

Source: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Coccinella_magnifica01.jpg

​​​​​​​ONECHELTENHAM.ORG

Source: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Clitostethus_arcuatus_cycle.jpg

ENVIRONMENTAL

INFO.

YOU CAN USE